Tagged: shoot ’em up

An action lover’s dream duo: Touhou Luna Nights and Crimzon Clover World Explosion (Switch)

These two indie games are so up my street it’s ridiculous, it’s like they were both tailor-made for me and that is a rare feeling indeed. Touhou Luna Nights is like Castlevania Symphony of the Night had a baby with Metal Slug. With the added bonus of time manipulation. Crimzon Clover World Explosion is a terribly named but extremely well done modern shmup. (Apparently weird names are mandatory for modern shmups.)

Let’s discuss Touhou Luna Nights first. A Metroidvania with time control; honestly it’s one of those great ideas that makes me say, “wow, I can’t believe no one did this before”. I say that, and actually there is another recent indie game called Timespinner that, as implied by the name, does in fact mess around with time. Even so, it’s such a strong idea you wonder why it’s not been done before in mainstream games. Continue reading

Things I love about… Lords of Thunder (TurboGrafx-CD)

I have a new year’s resolution: write more posts for the blog. And to achieve that I’m going to write shorter posts. I really outdid myself with my last post, and I think it partly explains why I’ve not been around. So with that said, let’s keep it brief(er than usual) here! Despite being busy these past weeks, I have somehow managed to play a crapton of games this Christmas/New Year break, including paying my old friend, Lords of Thunder, a long overdue visit. I’ve loved Lords of Thunder ever since it came out on the Wii’s Virtual Console service in 2008. After my Wii stopped working normally several years ago, I’d not been back to it. After some experimentation I was able to successfully initiate a Wii U transfer, which rescued my VC games and (to my surprise) all the save data too. That wasn’t the only surprise though – I was completely unprepared for the frankly incredible loading screen that accompanies a Wii to Wii U move.

Anyway, one of the first games I redownloaded on the Wii U was Lords of Thunder. As the title of this post states, I love it, and you’re about to read just some of the things I love about it. Continue reading

Soukyugurentai (Saturn) – an underrated classic

Soukyugurentai (aka Terra Diver) happens to be one of my all-time favourite games. Originally a 1996 Japan-only arcade shoot ’em up developed by Raizing, it was later ported to the Sega Saturn. Why do I love it so? Simply put, Soukyugurentai looks, sounds and plays like a dream. The gameplay is fast and furious, but not brainless; the game requires strategy and thought to master. Your ship handles great, with fluid and responsive controls. Last but not least, Soukyugurentai feels uniquely cinematic, with a dramatic musical score by Hitoshi Sakimoto and a striking visual style that holds up wonderfully to this day. Continue reading

Salamander Deluxe Pack Plus (Saturn) – is this biological or mechanical warfare?

It’s been a while, readers. But I’m back. That’s right, the PhD is over. Submitted and awaiting viva! Throughout these past few months, I haven’t stopped playing games entirely. Still, my enjoyment of life in general has increased dramatically now, and that extends to games too. After listening to a recent Retronauts episode about the Gradius series, I decided to dust off my copy of the expansively named Salamander Deluxe Pack Plus for the trusty Sega Saturn. I’d always been curious, so why not try these spin-offs of a beloved series?

Salamander Deluxe Pack Plus is a collection of three arcade games, namely Salamander, Life Force, and Salamander 2. The former two, which I’ll cover first, are variations on the same basic game released within a year of one another in 1986-7. Salamander 2, by comparison, released almost ten years later in 1996, and is a more modern iteration on the series formula. These games all riff on similar level themes, bosses and structure, many of these themselves nabbed from the Gradius series. For instance, every game alternates between horizontal and vertical scrolling stages, and contains a mix of biological and sci-fi themed stages. Continue reading

Breaking the space-time continuum in Gradius V (PS2)

Reputed to be one of Treasure’s best games and one of the most ambitious shmups of all time, Gradius V is the stuff of legend. Expensive and difficult to track down on its native PS2, thanks to the PS3’s online store it is finally within easy reach for PS3 owners. And at a cheap price too! Having sunk my teeth into it at long last, I’m happy to say that in my opinion this game’s glowing reputation is justified.

Perhaps the most impressive thing about Gradius V is the way it shakes up the conventions of the traditional 2D shooter genre. When I wrote about Shienryu on PS1 in my most recent shmup review, I concluded that it was competent in all areas but inspired in none. Gradius V is similarly competent, retaining the tried and true gameplay mechanics of the Gradius series, but this fifth entry is also incredibly inspired, adding puzzle elements into a genre that is generally much more taxing on your thumbs than your brain. Continue reading